Owings Mills (410) 356-9939

Towson/Lutherville (410) 823-8888

White Marsh (410) 657-5770

Baltimore (410) 752-2330

Functional Neurology

Functional neurology helps people gain control of their bodies and get their lives back! At Health Quest, Dr. Grady, a certified Chiropractic Neuorologist, addresses a variety of issues, from peripheral neuropathy and chronic migraines to concussions/mild traumatic brain injuries and balance disorders. Those who benefit the most suffer from:

  • Insomnia
  • Migraines
  • Light Sensitivity
  • Vision Changes
  • Nausea
  • Sound Sensitivity
  • Balance Issues
  • Physical Fatigue
  • Mental Fatigue
  • Memory Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Focus Issues
  • Motor Control Issues

Beyond Concussion: How to recognize and treat

The majority of Traumatic Brain Injury cases resolve within one week to one month. After 1 month of persistent symptoms, Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) is likely to be present

What is a Concussion?

Concussion symptoms.

Concussions are a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. The brain can bounce around or twist in the skull, creating chemical changes in the brain and sometimes stretching and damaging brain cells. You do NOT need to “get knocked out” to sustain a concussion.

Even though concussions are called “mild”, do not let that fool you… all concussions are serious. Learn more about concussions on the CDC website.

Signs and Symptoms

Evidence of a concussion can go beyond the physical and persist in virtually all aspects of a patient’s mental function. Signs and symptoms include:

Physical: Headache, dizziness, balance problems, sensitivity to noise/light, nausea/vomiting, blurry vision, fatigue, general body aches, etc.

Cognitive: Difficulty thinking clearly, feeling slowed down, difficulty concentrating, can’t remember new information easily.

Emotional/Mood: Irritability, anxiety, mood swings.

Sleep: Sleeping more or less than usual, trouble falling asleep or staying asleep.

Standard Medical Protocols

Physical Rest: No physical exertion or sports activities until symptoms are resolved.

Brain Rest: Limited TV, reading, phone use, video games, and school work/school days.

Medication: Symptom relief with Tylenol/acetominophen for body aches and headaches, or Triptan class of drugs for migraine headaches.

When to Consider Post-Concussion Syndrome

Roughly 20% to 30% of people who sustain a concussion are not successful in eliminating symptoms within a month using standard medical protocols. Warning signs that Post-Concussion Syndrome may be present include one-plus months of the persistent presence of any concussive symptoms listed above, as well as the worsening of symptoms at any time

Health Quest PCS Treatment Options

All Health Quest treatments for Post-Concussion Syndrome are non-drug, non-surgical, and safe to be used in conjunction with the majority of concurrent medical therapies. They can include:

Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT) & Ocular Rehabilitation Therapy: Treats persistent symptoms of dizziness, headache, poor balance/coordination and visual dysfunction.

Non-Invasive Neuromodulation: A research-based, peer-reviewed treatment using vagus nerve stimulation, among others, that calms overactive nerves and stimulates underactive nerves to strengthen/modulate neural pathways associated with head pain and balance/dizziness.

Motion Guidance: Trains proprioception.

Physical Therapy/Manual Therapy: Helps decrease spasm, improve range of motion and increase stability.

Nutraceutical Interventions: Decreases persistent neuroinflammation in the brain with natural supplements such as Omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin, and resveratrol.

More Information

Diagnosis and prescribed treatment programs at Health Quest are performed by Dr. Sean Grady, DC with PT privileges, CFMP, DACNB. Dr. Grady holds the prestigious Diplomate from the American Chiropractic Neurology Board (DACNB), certifying him as a Functional Neurologist and allowing him to provide, in simple terms, brain rehab for those suffering from a variety of neurological conditions. These conditions include headache/migraine, vertigo/dizziness, stroke, neuropathy, concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Dr. Grady is also certified as a whiplash and soft tissue injury specialist through the Whiplash Injury Biomechanics and Traumatology program at the Spine Research Institute of San Diego and is pursuing dual Fellowship certification in both Concussion/MTBI and Vestibular Rehabilitation from the American College of Functional Neurology. He is the only certified Functional Neurologist in a 40-mile radius of the Baltimore metropolitan area.

Typically, a Functional Neurologist serves in the same consulting manner as a Medical Neurologist. The difference is that the therapies or applications of a Functional Neurologist do not include drugs or surgery. The treatments are brain-based and follow the principles of neuroplasticity, the notion that the nervous system can change according to the stimulation it is exposed to.

As mentioned above, although the Functional Neurology model does not employ medication or surgery, Dr. Grady will work with other medical providers and specialists to ensure a cooperative and integrative approach to every patient’s health goals.


Migraine Headaches

Proactive treatment options that work

Holding a pained head.

The one-year prevalence of migraine is 17.2% in females and 6.0% in males
Migraines are the 6th most common cause of disability worldwide
Migraine without aura is the most common, accounting for 80% of migraines

A New Migraine Theory

Migraine used to be considered a result of stenosis or narrowing of arteries in the brain, where those arteries constricted and then had a rebound dilation. However, the current theory, the neurovascular theory, holds that the fundamental problem is neurogenic; the trigeminal nerve (main facial nerve) innervates blood vessels in the brain and acts as a feedforward mechanism, facilitating the acute attack but not the causing the actual problem.

Standard Migraine (And Chronic Headache) Treatments

The traditional medical model supports intervention with medication and lifestyle changes to help prevent the onset of migraines. During a migraine attack, intervention with medication is also the go-to abortive therapy. Of concern, pharmaceuticals have significant side-effect profiles.

Prophylactic Therapies: Beta Blockers, Tricyclic Antidepressants, Topiramate, Flunarizine, MAOIs, & Gabapentin

Abortive Therapies: NSAIDs, 5-HT1 Agonists – Triptans, Ergot Alkaloids - Ergotamine & Dihydroergotamine, Narcotic Analgesics – Oxycodone, & Codeine

Health Quest Migraine Treatment Options

All treatments are non-drug, non-surgical and are safe to be used in conjunction with the majority of concurrent medical therapies. They can include:

Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT) & Ocular Rehabilitation Therapy: Treats persistent symptoms of dizziness, headache, poor balance/coordination and visual dysfunction.

Noninvasive Neuromodulation: A research-based, peer-reviewed treatment using vagus nerve, trigeminal nerve and occipital nerve stimulation, which calms overactive nerves and stimulates underactive nerves to strengthen/modulate neural pathways associated with head pain and balance/dizziness.

Spinal Stabilization Programs: Evaluation and physical therapy treatments for injuries to the cervical spine, such as whiplash.

Dietary Review: Evaluation of potential dietary triggers, with recommendations for modifications and substitutions.

Other Forms of Headaches Treated at Health Quest

  • Headaches Due To Trauma Of the Head and/or Neck, including Concussion or Whiplash from Sports, Motor-Vehicle Accidents, or Falls
  • Chronic Daily Headaches
  • Tension-Type Headaches
  • Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgias; i.e., Cluster Headaches

More Information

Diagnosis and prescribed treatment programs at Health Quest are performed by Dr. Sean Grady, DC with PT privileges, CFMP, DACNB. Dr. Grady holds the prestigious Diplomate from the American Chiropractic Neurology Board (DACNB), certifying him as a Functional Neurologist and allowing him to provide, in simple terms, brain rehab for those suffering from a variety of neurological conditions. These conditions include headache/migraine, vertigo/dizziness, stroke, neuropathy, concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Dr. Grady is also certified as a whiplash and soft tissue injury specialist through the Whiplash Injury Biomechanics and Traumatology program at the Spine Research Institute of San Diego and is pursuing dual Fellowship certification in both Concussion/MTBI and Vestibular Rehabilitation from the American College of Functional Neurology. He is the only certified Functional Neurologist in a 40-mile radius of the Baltimore metropolitan area.

Typically, a Functional Neurologist serves in the same consulting manner as a Medical Neurologist. The difference is that the therapies or applications of a Functional Neurologist do not include drugs or surgery. The treatments are brain-based and follow the principles of neuroplasticity, the notion that the nervous system can change according to the stimulation it is exposed to.

As mentioned above, although the Functional Neurology model does not employ medication or surgery, Dr. Grady will work with other medical providers and specialists to ensure a cooperative and integrative approach to every patient’s health goals.

References

Francesca Puledda, P. J. (2016). Current Approaches to Neuromodulation in Primary Headaches: Focus on Vagal Nerve and Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation. Current Pain Headache Reports.

Goadsby, P. (2012). Pathophysiology of migraine. Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology, S15-S22.

Jasvinder Chawla, M. M. (2017, May 10). Medscape - Migraine Headache. Retrieved from medscape.com: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1142556-overview#a2

Lipton RB, Scher AI, Kolodner K, Liberman J, Steiner TJ, & Stewart WF. (2002). Migraine in the United States: epidemiology and patterns of health care use. Neurology, 885-94.


Vertigo

Vertigo and Dizziness

A guide to treatment options that work

Tree branches slightly out of focus.

Two of the most common reasons people seek medical attention
Accounted for approximately 3.9 million ER visits in the US in 2011
Exceeds $4 Billion per year in costs

Peripheral Vertigo

Peripheral vertigo is the most common cause of vertigo in primary care. 93% of primary care patients with vertigo have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), acute vestibular neuritis, or Meniere’s disease. Also common is labyrinthitis, perilymph fistula, immune-mediated inner ear disease, and acoustic neuroma.

Central Vertigo

About 25% of vertigo cases are caused by central deficits. Most cases of central vertigo are due to cerebrovascular disorders, migraine, cerebellar disorders, MS, posterior fossa tumors, and neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment for many of these conditions may be warranted, provided the underlying cause has been identified and treated.

Health Quest Treatment Options

For those with unilateral or bilateral vestibular hypofunction who have vestibular deficit-associated impairments and functional limitations, the American Physical Therapy Association Neurology Section recommends vestibular rehabilitation.

A typical strategy that Health Quest employs is noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation and noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation, in conjunction with traditional vestibular rehabilitation therapy. This approach enhances the effectiveness of therapy and is likely mediated through the process of neuroplasticity in the peripheral and central nervous systems.

Contact us today to request more information about our approach to chiropractor neurology and physical therapy services. We proudly serve residents of Owings Mills, Maryland, and the entire North Central Baltimore region: Towson, Lutherville-Timonium, Cockeysville, Hunt Valley, Parkville, and Roland Park.


Peripheral Neuropathy

Feet with thumbtacks sticking out in various locations.

Do you have pain, tingling, numbness and/or burning in your hands or feet? These are the classic symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy. Unfortunately, this is a condition that tends to progress, even moving up the arms and legs. Worst of all, doctors are doing little to offer hope for relief – let alone actual reversal – of this life-impacting condition.

The most typical solutions out there are a) medications to mask the symptoms, and b) those dreaded words, “Just live with it!”

Well, we at Health Quest are here to tell you a different story – a story of hope. We have developed treatment protocols using the latest FDA-approved technologies to give you a real solution with real results. Our patients average 74% actual improvement in their symptoms within 60 days – without drugs or surgery!

But not everyone qualifies for care. Sometimes the issue really isn't peripheral neuropathy, and sometimes the condition has progressed past the point of no return. Schedule your Neuropathy Severity Exam today to find out your options and to see if this treatment program is right for you.

What Does the Exam Include?

  • Thorough health history to identify the cause of your neuropathy
  • Detailed evaluation of your hands/feet to find out how they respond to various sensations such as heat, cold, sharp, dull, etc.
  • Scored analysis of your nerve damage severity
  • Creation of a treatment plan for those qualifying for care

Normally, this exam costs $125. However, if you mention visiting our website, we will reduce that exam fee to $69. Reach out today – we're ready to help!

Don't take our word for it!  See what other patients say about their experience at Health Quest:


More Information

Diagnosis and prescribed treatment programs at Health Quest are performed by Dr. Sean Grady, DC with PT privileges, CFMP, DACNB. Dr. Grady holds the prestigious Diplomate from the American Chiropractic Neurology Board (DACNB), certifying him as a Functional Neurologist and allowing him to provide, in simple terms, brain rehab for those suffering from a variety of neurological conditions. These conditions include headache/migraine, vertigo/dizziness, stroke, neuropathy, concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Dr. Grady is also certified as a whiplash and soft tissue injury specialist through the Whiplash Injury Biomechanics and Traumatology program at the Spine Research Institute of San Diego and is pursuing dual Fellowship certification in both Concussion/MTBI and Vestibular Rehabilitation from the American College of Functional Neurology. He is the only certified Functional Neurologist in a 40-mile radius of the Baltimore metropolitan area.

Typically, a Functional Neurologist serves in the same consulting manner as a Medical Neurologist. The difference is that the therapies or applications of a Functional Neurologist do not include drugs or surgery. The treatments are brain-based and follow the principles of neuroplasticity, the notion that the nervous system can change according to the stimulation it is exposed to.

As mentioned above, although the Functional Neurology model does not employ medication or surgery, Dr. Grady will work with other medical providers and specialists to ensure a cooperative and integrative approach to every patient’s health goals.

References

Byung In Han, H. S. (2011). Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises. Journal of Clinical Neurology, 184-196.
Dowd, K. H. (2002). Symptoms of vertigo in general practice: a prospective study of diagnosis. British Journal of General Practice, 809-812.
Hall CD , Herdman SJ , Whitney SL , Cass SP , Clendaniel RA , Fife TD , . . . Woodhouse SN. (2016). Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline: FROM THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION NEUROLOGY SECTION. Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 124-55.
Hesham M Samy, M. P. (2017, March 7). Dizziness, Vertigo and Imbalance: Medscape. Retrieved from Medscape.com: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2149881-overview
Philip E Zapanta, M. F. (2016, March 28). Vestibular Rehabilitation: Medscape. Retrieved from medscape.com: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/883878-overview
Tehrani AS, S., Coughlan D, Hsieh YH, Mantokoudis G, Korley FK, Kerber KA, . . . Newman-Toker DE. (2013). Rising annual costs of dizziness presentations to U.S. emergency departments. Academy of Emergency Medicine, 689-696.